Posts Tagged :

taproom

The Seers

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The Seers, an experimental folk-rock duo from Fort Collins, CO, have transformed their shared passion for great songs into a walking, talking, modern-day jukebox of musical versatility. With a “stunning repertoire” of over 700 covers and 100 originals spanning from alternative rock to Americana country, the Seers deliver sing-along performances that bring people closer together.

As a duo, three-piece, four-piece, and five-piece band, Seers perform at regional festivals (SXSW 2015 Colorado Music Showcase), weddings (in Idaho, Utah, Wyoming and Colorado), private events, restaurants, bars, breweries, memorials, markets, and more. With over fifteen years of collaboration, it easy to see why they’re in high regional demand: they love to play.

As prolific songwriters and aspiring recording artists, Collins and Waters have been recording and releasing albums as The Seers since 2010. Their first was an underground, stream-of-consciousness EP titled “Universal Tree.” Two eclectic rock albums followed: “The Seers” (2013) and “Cellophane Eyes” (2014). In 2016, in collaboration with Danny Kalb (Beck, Ben Harper, and Foster the People), The Seers released the indie folk EP “Signals” to critical acclaim. Their fourth release, the full-length “Better Days” is out May 13th, 2017

folk • rock
http://www.theseersband.com

Scratch and Sniff – Homegrown Fresh Hop IPA Release

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Homegrown Fresh Hop IPA release today at 2pm (growlers welcome)! We know many of you are just as excited as we are to taste one of our beers featuring our homegrown Centennial hops. There’s something special about watching these bines (not a type-o!) grow through summer and then literally enjoying the fruits of their labor. John pulled hops before last weekend’s snow to wet hop two American IPA kegs for release in the taproom only. That’s under an hour from bine to beer! Definitely a dream of John’s. We are excited to share this special beer!

City Star doubles size of brewery with barrel room and beer garden article in Berthoud Surveyor

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Posted by editor on October 12, 2017
By Shelley Widhalm
The Surveyor

John and Whitney Way of Berthoud, co-owners of the brewery they opened five years ago, expanded the 2,500-square-foot brewery and taproom by adding a barrel room, an additional seating area, and a beer garden in back — as well as another set of restrooms and room for an office.

“We’re a community fixture here,” Whitney said. “It wasn’t long before we realized the seating area and taproom space was smaller than we’d like it to be.”

Three years ago the Ways purchased the building to the east of the main brewery when Chris Gischel, co-owner of Simply Shabulous, temporarily closed her business before reopening it on Massachusetts Avenue in May. The Ways did much of the work to the building, remodeling it to be a separate space connected to the brewery by a large, open doorway.

The additional space meant the brewery could more than triple its seating capacity. Originally there were 50 seats in the taproom. The barrel room adds another 25 seats, the indoor seating area 24, and the beer garden more than 50.

The Ways built the barrel room to have a double purpose, to store oak barrels to age their beers and to provide seating at two long tables. They called the room the Zoller Barrel House to reflect the building’s history — a man named Jake Zoller had owned a shoe shop and had his living quarters in the same space from the 1930s to the 1970s. The building which had multiple purposes, but the shoe shop was the most well-known, had been moved from old Berthoud to another location before being moved to its current location.

“That’s really an iconic building in Berthoud’s streetscape,” said Mark French, president of the Berthoud Historical Society, adding he appreciated how the Ways retained the building’s front facade. “The owners of a local business respect the heritage and understand how important it is to improve it while you repurpose it.”

The room, which spans 1,000 square feet, will serve as a space for private parties and events.

“Having the additional space available provides greater flexibility in the events we can offer and the groups we can accommodate,” Whitney said.

Across from the barrel room is an indoor seating area with a large windows facing out onto the beer garden, essentially a patio with more seating, a stage that will be used for musical entertainment in the warmer months, and a fire pit in the colder months.

“The beer garden is going to be a real draw,” Whitney said. “It will be more of a destination with the outdoor space.”

The Ways commissioned graffiti artist Gamma Acosta of Longmont to paint a mural of a poker scene, entitled “All In at City Star,” on the west side of the beer garden and outside of the main building. Acosta began work in March and is finishing the project.

Opposite the mural along the fence the Ways plan to plant a row of hop vines, providing what John describes as a “green fence.” The Ways may use the hops, which they purchased from a hydroponic hop farm in Fort Collins, to make some of their beers, but that depends on how the plants turn out. “We’ll have to see what the quality is like,” Whitney said, adding the hops will serve a second purpose. “The way the hop vines grow creates shade and ambience. It’s fun to have the ingredients of our beer growing right there. … It’s an enjoyable atmosphere to imbibe in a beer.”

Having the patio is appealing and the main focus of the Way’s expansion project, John said.

“It’s going to be a great, beautiful space to hang out with friends and family and enjoy some great beer,” he added.

John and Whitney opened the beer garden for Labor Day and plan to have the finishing touches completed by the end of the year, though they had wanted to open it two years ago, according to Whitney.

“We’ve learned from the first building,” she said. “We have been able to do more in terms of décor. We know more about … the finishing details not everyone notices but we appreciate.”

The Ways continue to lease the main part of the brewery from Whitney’s parents, Dan and Rudi Taylor, who in 2011 purchased a 10,000-square-foot, 100-year-old building they turned into retail and storage space. They operate two businesses there, Wishful Living and Happy Mango Beads.

The Ways named the brewery after the building’s original use, once the City Star Barn livery stable. The livery stable was torn down and rebuilt in the early 1900s as Jefferes Auto Co., one of the town’s first auto dealerships, before becoming Jefferes Garage and later Dean’s Furniture, a used furniture store in operation for about 30 years.

“We learned that and ran with it,” Whitney said about the brewery’s name, adding she and John created a walking tour of the brewery with a listing of the historical photos of Berthoud hanging throughout that they printed from historical society images.

The Taylors remodeled the entire building, and the Ways focused on their area, spending a year doing the work. They redid the façade, scraped the ceiling to have a rustic look, added new walls and installed a new concrete floor and interior systems. They were able to retain historical aspects of the building, such as the ceiling and interior brick, and constructed tables and the front of the bar out of some of the original structural wood beams and wood flooring. They used some of the windows to serve as chalkboard menus.

“Anytime we could reuse aspects of the building we did,” Whitney said.

To add to the historical feel, the Ways created four tables out of oak barrels that are in the tap room and a barrel chandelier John made out of another barrel. They used corrugated metal along the wall and incorporated wood, metal, brick and concrete elements throughout, using rustic earth tones.

“Anything we could do ourselves, that’s how we made it possible,” Whitney said.

The Ways completed the remodel by the time of the brewery’s grand opening on May 4, 2012.

City Star Brewery is open 2-9 p.m. Monday to Wednesday, 2-10 p.m. Thursday and Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday and noon-9 p.m. Sunday.

“We put a lot of hard work, time and energy into building and creating the space,” John said. “On Fridays and Saturdays there’s nowhere to sit. We have more seating capacity to hold all the people that come in, so everybody can enjoy City Star’s delicious beer.”

Original article source: http://www.berthoudsurveyor.com/city-star-doubles-size-of-brewery-with-barrel-room-and-beer-garden/

Tour de brew: City Star Brewing

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Tour de brew: City Star Brewing
A pickin’ and a grinnin’ and a drinkin’ in Berthoud

By Michael J. Casey – January 11, 2017

City Star Brewing
Photo Credit: Susan France
JD Hegan, beer slinger for City Star Brewing.

Let’s hear it for those City Star Workers,” The Stanleytones singer said to a packed house last Saturday night, and the people obliged the man behind the banjo. They were a delightfully pleasant bunch, 50 or so locals who came out on this frigid January evening to listen to some live bluegrass and enjoy a pint or three. One couple even got up and danced, which many people stood by and politely watched, waiting for the exuberant couple to dance their way away from the bathroom door they were blocking.

If this was a bar in Denver, Boulder or even Fort Collins, there is no doubt that an impatient patron would have rudely interrupted the couple’s clogging to relieve themselves, but up here in Berthoud, the people are a little more relaxed and a little more hospitable. And thank goodness for that because it was Saturday night and there wasn’t a seat to be had. The Stanleytones had just gotten warm and no one was clearing out anytime soon. The bartender took pity on us and cleared her dinner from a table in the back and allowed us to take up residence next to the walk-in cooler — which featured a photo of a glaring Christopher Walken with the caption: “Close the Walken!” We were right at home.

As my associate poked her way through City Star’s collection of board games, I procured the brews for the evening: 10 samples of City Star’s offerings: five mainstays — Cowboy’s Golden (5% ABV), Local Yokel pale ale (6%), All American IPA (6.5%), Red Necktar (6.5%) and Bandit Brown (5.5%); and five seasonals — Night Watchman (6%), Raspberry Bandit (6%), Chai Watchman (6%), Mule Kick (9%) and Widowmaker (11.5%).

Red Necktar and Bandit Brown are standouts, but it’s those dark delicious seasonals that make City Star worth the trip. The Night Watchman stout has less heft and more bouquet, which favors dark chocolate and coffee in a delightful aroma that smells a little like a Christmas dessert, while the Chai Watchman ups the ante with cinnamon, ginger, cloves, cardamom and a whole lot of vanilla beans. That’s quite a punch in one glass. Ditto for Mule Kick, a strong ale brewed with Colorado wildflower honey that hybrids the best qualities of beer and wine into one deliciously dark draught.

After we finished our flights and a few rounds of Scruples, we decided to hit the dusty trail, but not before a visit to the facilities. There, in the hallway adjacent to the bar, are a series of historical photographs of Berthoud throughout the years. While we admired a bird’s eye view of the town, a local approached us and asked if we were out-of-towners and gave us a couple of suggestions of which bars to drink at and where we could sleep it off. As she bid us good luck and returned to the stomp and twag of the music, I made a decision right then and there: next time, I’m bringing cowboy boots.

On tap: City Star Brewing. 321 Mountain Ave., Berthoud, 970-532-7827, citystarbrewing.com.

Full article available here: http://www.boulderweekly.com/cuisine/drink/tour-de-brew-city-star-brewing/