City Star Brewing

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By in News Comments Off on New in brew: A stout worth saving article in Boulder Weekly

New in brew: A stout worth saving article in Boulder Weekly

City Star releases the 2017 Outlaw Imperial Stout in bottles

By Michael J. Casey – November 2, 2017
Most savvy beer drinkers will tell you the same thing: The fresher the better. While true for the vast majority of American lagers and ales, some beers do benefit from a pit stop in a barrel and a little lag time in the bottle. It takes a little patience and some experimentation, but Whitney Way, co-owner of City Star Brewery, says she is enjoying “digging into the barrel-aged side of craft beer.”

Located in Berthoud and operating with a 3.5-barrel brewing system, City Star began playing around with barrel-aged beers in 2012 — it was a raspberry brown ale aged in a cabernet sauvignon barrel. It soon started bottling barrel-aged concoctions, starting with Outlaw, an imperial stout aged in whiskey barrels from Breckenridge Distillery.

“The response was overwhelming,” Way says. “Since then, we’ve been releasing a barrel-aged beer in bottles ever two to three months.”

If the response was overwhelming for the 2015 Outlaw, then City Star’s latest bottling, the 2017 Outlaw Imperial Stout, ought to garner even more enthusiastic acclaim. Aged in Heaven Hill Kentucky Bourbon barrels for 14–18 months, the Outlaw is loaded with dark chocolate, dried red fruit, black strap molasses, vanilla and plenty of boozy bourbon. It’s thick and rich, but drink it slow; at 12.75 percent alcohol by volume (ABV), the Outlaw packs one hell of a wallop.

“It was brewed to be a high-ABV imperial stout, brewed for those barrels,” Way explains. “In barrels, there is a little bit of evaporation that occurs, especially when you’re keeping beer in there for over a year.”

Not too mention the residual liquor absorbed by the barrels.

“We like to use barrels that are still pretty wet,” Way continues. “We really like the flavor [it] provides.”

The aroma of bourbon whiskey greets you once you chip through the black wax sealing Outlaw’s bottle cap and pry the beast open. It’ll come out swinging, but give it a minute or five to open up in the glass and let the air smooth out those edges — a solid indication the brew will only improve over time.

“This particular beer will definitely age well,” Way says. “We’ve had several different people who had a 2015 [Outlaw] and are drinking them side-by-side with the 2017 now. [They say] right now is the sweet spot for 2015.”

Do an Outlaw side-by-side comparison and you’ll taste what can be achieved by cellaring: the aggressiveness and heat diminish while the flavors deepen into a mellow, nuanced taste.

“That’s kind of the beauty of aging those big imperial stouts,” Way says. “A lot of those key flavors hang out and the beers just improve over time.”

Twenty-two-ounce bottles of 2017 Outlaw Imperial Stout can be acquired at City Star for $18. Grab one for the holidays and one for the cellar; 2019 will be here before you know it.

Original article source: http://www.boulderweekly.com/cuisine/new-brew-stout-worth-saving/

By in News Comments Off on City Star doubles size of brewery with barrel room and beer garden article in Berthoud Surveyor

City Star doubles size of brewery with barrel room and beer garden article in Berthoud Surveyor

Posted by editor on October 12, 2017
By Shelley Widhalm
The Surveyor

John and Whitney Way of Berthoud, co-owners of the brewery they opened five years ago, expanded the 2,500-square-foot brewery and taproom by adding a barrel room, an additional seating area, and a beer garden in back — as well as another set of restrooms and room for an office.

“We’re a community fixture here,” Whitney said. “It wasn’t long before we realized the seating area and taproom space was smaller than we’d like it to be.”

Three years ago the Ways purchased the building to the east of the main brewery when Chris Gischel, co-owner of Simply Shabulous, temporarily closed her business before reopening it on Massachusetts Avenue in May. The Ways did much of the work to the building, remodeling it to be a separate space connected to the brewery by a large, open doorway.

The additional space meant the brewery could more than triple its seating capacity. Originally there were 50 seats in the taproom. The barrel room adds another 25 seats, the indoor seating area 24, and the beer garden more than 50.

The Ways built the barrel room to have a double purpose, to store oak barrels to age their beers and to provide seating at two long tables. They called the room the Zoller Barrel House to reflect the building’s history — a man named Jake Zoller had owned a shoe shop and had his living quarters in the same space from the 1930s to the 1970s. The building which had multiple purposes, but the shoe shop was the most well-known, had been moved from old Berthoud to another location before being moved to its current location.

“That’s really an iconic building in Berthoud’s streetscape,” said Mark French, president of the Berthoud Historical Society, adding he appreciated how the Ways retained the building’s front facade. “The owners of a local business respect the heritage and understand how important it is to improve it while you repurpose it.”

The room, which spans 1,000 square feet, will serve as a space for private parties and events.

“Having the additional space available provides greater flexibility in the events we can offer and the groups we can accommodate,” Whitney said.

Across from the barrel room is an indoor seating area with a large windows facing out onto the beer garden, essentially a patio with more seating, a stage that will be used for musical entertainment in the warmer months, and a fire pit in the colder months.

“The beer garden is going to be a real draw,” Whitney said. “It will be more of a destination with the outdoor space.”

The Ways commissioned graffiti artist Gamma Acosta of Longmont to paint a mural of a poker scene, entitled “All In at City Star,” on the west side of the beer garden and outside of the main building. Acosta began work in March and is finishing the project.

Opposite the mural along the fence the Ways plan to plant a row of hop vines, providing what John describes as a “green fence.” The Ways may use the hops, which they purchased from a hydroponic hop farm in Fort Collins, to make some of their beers, but that depends on how the plants turn out. “We’ll have to see what the quality is like,” Whitney said, adding the hops will serve a second purpose. “The way the hop vines grow creates shade and ambience. It’s fun to have the ingredients of our beer growing right there. … It’s an enjoyable atmosphere to imbibe in a beer.”

Having the patio is appealing and the main focus of the Way’s expansion project, John said.

“It’s going to be a great, beautiful space to hang out with friends and family and enjoy some great beer,” he added.

John and Whitney opened the beer garden for Labor Day and plan to have the finishing touches completed by the end of the year, though they had wanted to open it two years ago, according to Whitney.

“We’ve learned from the first building,” she said. “We have been able to do more in terms of décor. We know more about … the finishing details not everyone notices but we appreciate.”

The Ways continue to lease the main part of the brewery from Whitney’s parents, Dan and Rudi Taylor, who in 2011 purchased a 10,000-square-foot, 100-year-old building they turned into retail and storage space. They operate two businesses there, Wishful Living and Happy Mango Beads.

The Ways named the brewery after the building’s original use, once the City Star Barn livery stable. The livery stable was torn down and rebuilt in the early 1900s as Jefferes Auto Co., one of the town’s first auto dealerships, before becoming Jefferes Garage and later Dean’s Furniture, a used furniture store in operation for about 30 years.

“We learned that and ran with it,” Whitney said about the brewery’s name, adding she and John created a walking tour of the brewery with a listing of the historical photos of Berthoud hanging throughout that they printed from historical society images.

The Taylors remodeled the entire building, and the Ways focused on their area, spending a year doing the work. They redid the façade, scraped the ceiling to have a rustic look, added new walls and installed a new concrete floor and interior systems. They were able to retain historical aspects of the building, such as the ceiling and interior brick, and constructed tables and the front of the bar out of some of the original structural wood beams and wood flooring. They used some of the windows to serve as chalkboard menus.

“Anytime we could reuse aspects of the building we did,” Whitney said.

To add to the historical feel, the Ways created four tables out of oak barrels that are in the tap room and a barrel chandelier John made out of another barrel. They used corrugated metal along the wall and incorporated wood, metal, brick and concrete elements throughout, using rustic earth tones.

“Anything we could do ourselves, that’s how we made it possible,” Whitney said.

The Ways completed the remodel by the time of the brewery’s grand opening on May 4, 2012.

City Star Brewery is open 2-9 p.m. Monday to Wednesday, 2-10 p.m. Thursday and Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday and noon-9 p.m. Sunday.

“We put a lot of hard work, time and energy into building and creating the space,” John said. “On Fridays and Saturdays there’s nowhere to sit. We have more seating capacity to hold all the people that come in, so everybody can enjoy City Star’s delicious beer.”

Original article source: http://www.berthoudsurveyor.com/city-star-doubles-size-of-brewery-with-barrel-room-and-beer-garden/

By in News Comments Off on City Star Brewing Releases Outlaw in Bottles: Imperial Stout Aged in Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey Barrels

City Star Brewing Releases Outlaw in Bottles: Imperial Stout Aged in Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey Barrels

For Immediate Release:
City Star Brewing Releases Outlaw in Bottles: Imperial Stout Aged in Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey Barrels

The latest in the City Star Zoller Barrel Aged Series will be released in the City Star taproom on Saturday, October 21st, Outlaw. The 2017 vintage of this imperial stout was aged 14-18 months in Kentucky bourbon whiskey oak barrels and weighs in at 12.75% abv. Flavors of rich chocolate, toffee, dark dried fruit, oak, vanilla and of course American whiskey. A rich and creamy mouthfeel leaves you lingering for another pour.

“This is a very special release for us. Though we began barrel aging beer in 2012, our 2015 vintage of Outlaw was our first bottling of any kind at City Star. It is exciting to see where City Star was at the time of our 2015 release in comparison to this release, as it coincides with the opening of our long awaited beer garden and Zoller Barrel House.” – co-owner Whitney Way.

Bottles will be available for sale at $18/22oz bottle, AND Outlaw will be on draft for samplingEach bottle is dipped in wax and hand stamped with the City Star Brewing seal.

City Star will be hosting an Outlaw Preview in the taproom on Monday, October 2nd to kick off GABF festivities! More details about this event can be found at: citystarbrewing.com/outlaw-preview. For those attending GABF swing by our booth R7 for a limited release of Outlaw during each session. 

Outlaw 2017

Outlaw 2017

Outlaw 2017

By in News Comments Off on City Star Brewing Feature Article in Company Week

City Star Brewing Feature Article in Company Week

City Star BrewingCity Star Brewing
by Angela Rose on July 7, 2017, 07:38 am MDT
www.citystarbrewing.com
Berthoud, Colorado
Founded: 2012
Privately owned
Employees: 10
Industry: Brewing & Distilling
Products: Beer

With a big expansion, founders Whitney and John Way see their brewery becoming even more of a fixture in the local community.

“We always joke that Berthoud chose us,” laughs Whitney Way when asked why she and her husband, John, located their brewery in a small Northern Colorado town with less than 6,000 residents. That choice was made when family members purchased a century-old building in the city’s quaint downtown area that had once been home to one of Berthoud’s oldest businesses: City Star Barn.

“They came to us and said, ‘Hey, this is something you guys have always dreamt about,'” Way recalls. “We had the opportunity to rent this great, visible space, so we dove into the application process and self-financed by loading up credit cards for the most part.”

City Star Brewing

Over the course of 18 months, the couple completed a full renovation and purchased necessary brewery equipment. “It was a building that some people probably would have just torn down,” she says. “We were lucky to be a part of its renovation. During the build out, we did everything ourselves that we could from painting to woodworking. Our first equipment purchase was an old walk-in cooler from Upslope Brewing Company.”

To this day, they continue to produce beer on their original 3.5-barrel system, brewing each recipe two to four times in a row to fill their 7- and 15-barrel fermentation and bright tanks.

“We brew quite a bit on our mighty little system,” chuckles Way. In 2016, that amounted to 925 barrels of their six popular mainstays and around 40 different seasonals. “We’ve also been ramping up our barrel aging program,” she adds. “We have a lot of fun trying to release two to three unique beers every month. Some we repeat from year to year. Others we repeat but make changes to the recipe. Then there are always beers that we retire so that we can add new seasonals to the list.”

City Star Brewing

While they love playing around with new recipes, and are self-distributing kegs to local bars and restaurants, Way doesn’t see their total production number growing anytime soon.

“Our goal has always been to be a taproom-centric brewery,” she explains. “When we started out, we looked up to breweries like Strange Craft Beer Company, Wit’s End Brewing Company, and Copper Kettle Brewing Company. We felt like that would be attainable for us. Then, as we continued to grow and establish relationships with bigger breweries, we learned things that reinforced our decision to choose this model. So, we’ve really been investing in our taproom and local community.”

To that end, the Ways are currently wrapping up a 2,000-square-foot indoor and 1,000-square-foot outdoor expansion. “We bought the land and building to the east of City Star Brewing almost three years ago,” Whitney says. “We always knew that we’d need more taproom space. While we weren’t quite ready to dive in, we didn’t want to miss the opportunity. It has taken us quite a while to renovate it because we’re doing a lot of it ourselves. We were able to get a construction loan about a year ago to help us get through some of the bigger chores, but John has still had his hand in everything from framing to electric work.”

City Star Brewing

The pair hopes that the expansion — which includes a rentable barrel room, new bathrooms and spacious outdoor beer garden — will help them continue to establish a foundation as Berthoud’s local gathering place.

“On a weekly basis, we have live music and food trucks,” Way says. “We also love to collaborate with local organizations. We have an annual festival called Hops and Harley that celebrates dogs and craft beer. Flap Jack Day is another big annual event. We also do smaller events throughout the year like local benefits. Our community is really important to us, and we’re always looking for ways to participate in some way or another.”

Favorite beers: “John and I agree on a lot of things,” Way says, “and the beers we like tend to change with the seasons. In the summertime, we’ll drink a lot of refreshing lagers and juicy IPAs. When it’s colder, we especially like malty beers.” She points to the brewery’s bestsellers — Cowboy’s Golden, Bandit Brown and All American IPA — as great representations of the styles they love most.

City Star Brewing

Challenges: Way says one of City Star’s current challenges is finding the best way to take advantage of the recent expansion. “We have the awesome new space and we need to harness it,” she added. “It’s a really exciting challenge to have actually.”

Opportunities: Way says there is still a lot of opportunity for expanding their customer base within the immediate area. “It’s a small town, but a growing one as well,” she says.

Needs: “When we first opened, we bought what we could on the budget that we had,” Way says. “We’re now definitely at the point where we need to invest in a grain mill and a keg washer. It would be great to upgrade our brew system as well. We’ve been so focused on the expansion project that it will be nice to be able to refocus some energy and resources into our brewhouse.”

City Star Brewing

Original Article Source: https://companyweek.com/company-profile/city-star-brewing/brewing-beverage